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Dem

Dem

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Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World

Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World - Jack Weatherford Having listened a couple of years kago to the 5 Star captivating and detailed podcast by Funjokyk Dan Carlin - HardCore Histroy[b:Wrath of the Khans|37804116|Wrath of the Khans (Hardcore History, #43-47)|Dan Carlin|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1514984298s/37804116.jpg|59475697][bc:Wrath of the Khans|37804116|Wrath of the Khans (Hardcore History, #43-47)|Dan Carlin|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1514984298s/37804116.jpg|59475697] I became fascinated with Genghis Khan and when this book came up on my recommendation feed in GoodReads I decided to revisit this period in history

The Mongols existed during the 13th and 14th centuries and was the largest contiguous land empire in history. They were experienced rulers way ahead of their time not only in in military terms but also in trade and agriculture and without doubt have played a major part in making of the modern world. They were ruthless beyond belief and left devastation in their wake where ever they conquered. This is a very well researched account that explores the sheer domination of Genghis Khan and the Mongol Empire of 1000 years ago.
This book does in my opinion however tend to learn towards painting a more favourable picture of how great the Mongols were and the positive aspects of their reign and this is extremely interesting too as they are believed to be responsible for the making of the modern world with the introduction of paper currency, improvements lin trade and agriculture and the tolerance of allowing their subjects to practice different religions as long as they prayed for the ruling families.

While I enjoyed this book I do highly recommend Dan Carlin and his [b:Wrath of the Khans|37804116|Wrath of the Khans (Hardcore History, #43-47)|Dan Carlin|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1514984298s/37804116.jpg|59475697] podcast for its meticulous research but above all the way he brings history to life in a manner I have never encountered before and encourages the listener to think outside the box.
I
Enjoyed this book as its interesting, easy to read, factual and even if you don't have an interest in history I think this account will intrigue and fascinate any reader. I always love when a book teaches the reader new things.